A Moment to Remember? Survey re-2 minute Silence

Dear Friends and Colleagues,

I am  currently doing some research for an article on changing idioms of collective remembrance in Britain. I thought it might be interesting to ‘crowd source’ some information about attitudes to the recent Remembrance Sunday and the official two minutes silence the following day. I would be very grateful if you could find a few minutes to answer the short questionnaire (below) and return it to me. I  will of course treat your responses as confidential and any  quotes used in the article will be unattributed. Look forward to hearing from you,

Phil Cohen

Research director: Living Maps    http://www.livingmaps.org.uk

Emeritus Professor  in Cultural Studies, University of East London ; Visiting Professor , Geography, Environment and Development Studies, Birkbeck College, University of London

Website :  http://www.philcohenworks.com

Latest Blogs: Now you see it, now you don’t: reflections on the pop up economy; Glass Ceilings: remembering a pioneer urbanist /The dialectics of trespass in ethnographic fieldwork

Birkbeck ISR Lecture : http://backdoorbroadcasting.net/2014/10/phil-cohen-our-kind-of-town-citizen-social-science-participatory-mapping-and-the-struggle-for-a-just-city/?pid=16189

Latest Books :

On the Wrong Side of the  Tracks?  East London and the Post Olympics (2013): http://www.lwbooks.co.uk/books/archive/tracks.html

A Moment to  Remember?

  1. Did you watch or attend any event connected with this year’s Remembrance Sunday? If so could you give some details ( i.e. what form it  took, who organised it, your involvement) and what your main motivation was? Did you buy a poppy?.

2a. Did you observe the 2 minutes silence  this year?  If so can you remember  what  you  actually thought  about during the silence? If you cannot remember , was there some special reason for this?

2b.Was the silence observed at home , at work, in a public place or where else? Did you talk to anyone about it afterwards?

2c. If you  did not observe the silence was this because:

you forgot

you were in a place where it was impossible or inappropriate to do so

you have an objection  to this form of  commemoration

some other reason ( please specify)

  1. What ways  other  than public ceremonies and   rituals do you think that  wars   should be collectively remembered in Britain today?
  1. Do you , and/or close friends or family have any direct experience of  being in a war  zone (including Northern Ireland during the time of the troubles). If yes, can you give some details?
  1. This year there have been a lot of events, exhibitions , books, TV and radio programmes  and media coverage  commemorating  the centenary of the start of the Ist World War. Did you attend/listen/watch/read   any of these?.  If so,  what was your general impression of how the  ‘Great War ‘  was treated? . How revisionist did you think the approach was and in what ways did it depart from   the  traditional   patriotic  or ‘human tragedy’    accounts?

Thanks

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About seancreighton1947

Since moving to Norbury in July 2011 I have been active on local economy issues with Croydon TUC and Croydon Assembly, and am a member of the latter's Environment Forum. I am a member of the 5 Norbury Residents Associations Joint Planning Committee, and a Governor of Norbury Manor Primary School. I write for Croydon Citizen at http://thecroydoncitizen.com. I co-ordinate the Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and Croydon Radical History Networks and advise the North East People's History Project.. I give history talks and lead history walks. I retired in 2012 having worked in the community/voluntary sector and on heritage projects. My history interests include labour movement, mutuality, Black British, slavery & abolition, Edwardian roller skating and the social and political use of music and song. I have a particular interest in the histories of Battersea and Wandsworth, Croydon and Lambeth. I have a publishing imprint History & Social Action Publications.
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