Can Croydon Comeback?

Croydon Comeback is a twelve page report from the marketing agency Bare PR. Despite its website containing the supporting logos of the Council, Brick by Brick and the Historic Croydon Airport Trust, it has not previously shown up through Croydon internet searches. A big thanks to Josi Kiss for providing the link on her Facebook page.

www.barepr.co.uk

The report is downloadable here:

www.barepr.co.uk/croydon-comeback/?fbclid=IwAR0kBnMzpBB7Q3jLHA9jT0sedmuOlZn5yf8wqMyV_hcECMAyT8JalswIjGY

The company has also undertaken a case study on Historic Croydon Airport

www.barepr.co.uk/portfolio/croydon-airport

It consulted a wide range of organisations and activists and businesses and invited people to contribute but only through Twitter, Linkedin and Instagram – not much use to those who are not on these social media.

It has grouped thoughts and views into the following themes:

  • Change must be driven by the people
  • Inclusion that encompasses ‘hidden audiences’
  • Connectivity between Croydon’s spaces
  • Creativity as the language of community
  • From grey to green

It recognises that post-COVID poses ‘very real challenges’. It highlights the ‘huge increase in unemployment for 18-20 years olds’.

Change however ‘brings huge opportunity’.

Key points

  • (L)ocal people want to be actively and meaningfully involved in what comes next.’ ‘(R)esistance to ‘top-down’ authority-led consultations’. ‘Genuine co-creation’.
  • ‘Inclusion and access was also felt deeply and strongly as a key solution to rebuilding Croydon and its communities in a cohesive and collective way.’
  • ‘It seems that now could be a fork in the road at which to pause, adapt and turn the Westfield delay into an opportunity to rethink developments and building a stronger heart fir Croydon’ especially through building small businesses.
  • ‘With the Borough of Culture 2023 in sight many felt that the work had to start promptly and be sustainable rather than a big band that fizzles out quickly.’
  • ‘Beyond the parks it as felt more work needed to be done ‘greening streets’ and urban areas and making roads more welcoming for walkers and cyclists.’

The report draws readers attention to the Green Recovery Plan for Croydon put together by Cllr Jamie Audsley and others.

www.jamieaudsley.org/green-recovery

Comment

There is much in this report which echoes what I have been arguing through my blog postings over the last year. Some of them are here:

http://historyandsocialaction.blogspot.com/2020/09/key-support-for-green-economy-should.html

http://historyandsocialaction.blogspot.com/2020/07/the-need-for-creativity-in-job-creation.html

http://historyandsocialaction.blogspot.com/2020/07/can-croydons-economy-survive-covid-19.html

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com/2021/03/25/croydon-council-leadership-open-to-suggestions-for-improving-growth-zone-plan/

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com/2021/02/17/will-croydons-new-equalities-strategy-continue-past-tokenism/

https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com/2021/02/17/will-croydons-new-equalities-strategy-continue-past-tokenism/https://seancreighton1947.wordpress.com/2020/04/20/time-to-debate-croydon-borough-of-culture-2023/

About seancreighton1947

Since moving to Norbury in July 2011 I have been active on local economy, housing and environment issues with Croydon TUC and Croydon Assembly. I am a member of the Love Norbury Residents Associations Planning & Transport Committees, and Chair of Nobury Community Land Trust. I write for Croydon Citizen at http://thecroydoncitizen.com. I co-ordinate the Samuel Coleridge-Taylor and Croydon Radical History Networks and edit the North East Popular Politics database. History Project.. I give history talks and lead history walks. I retired in 2012 having worked in the community/voluntary sector and on heritage projects. My history interests include labour movement, mutuality, Black British, slavery & abolition, Edwardian roller skating and the social and political use of music and song. I have a particular interest in the histories of Battersea and Wandsworth, Croydon and Lambeth. I have a publishing imprint History & Social Action Publications.
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1 Response to Can Croydon Comeback?

  1. Pingback: Norbury Update 25 April | Norbury Watch

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